What Is Tewksburys First Name

Mark Roger Tewksbury, CC MSM (born February 7, 1968) is a Canadian former competitive swimmer. He is best known for winning the gold medal in the 100-metre backstroke at the 1992 Summer Olympics. Tewksbury trained at the University of Calgary. He competed at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea, and won a silver medal as a member of Canada's relay team. For some years he ranked as one of the top backstrokers in the world; never a strong below-the-water swimmer, he was unmatched on the surface, but, as the importance of below-the-water swimming increased, Tewksbury's ranking began to fall. Going into Barcelona, ​​Tewksbury was ranked fourth in the world and most pundits picked one of the powerful American swimmers to win gold. American Jeff Rouse, world record holder in the 100m backstroke, had beaten Tewksbury at the 1991 Pan Pacific Games and 1991 World Aquatics Championships the year before and was heavily favored to win gold. Using an underwater dolphin kick start Rouse took off to an early lead, leaving Tewksbury to play catch-up on both laps. Tewksbury would pass Rouse on the last stroke of the race, beating the American by just six one hundredths of a second-the same margin of victory Rouse had bested Tewksbury the year before at World Championships.

Tewksbury also won a bronze medal in the relay event in Barcelona.

Tewksbury would credit using visualization during his preparation to help instill self-belief and calm in the moments before the Olympic final. Tewksbury's gold medal was Canada's first at the Barcelona games and the first Canadian gold in swimming since the Communist-boycotted 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. Tewksbury also won a bronze medal in the relay event in Barcelona. He made the cover of Time magazine. He was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame, the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, and the International Swimming Hall of Fame and was named Canada's Male Athlete of the Year. After the Barcelona games, Tewksbury retired from swimming. After retirement, Tewksbury received a number of high-profile endorsement deals and worked as an athlete representative with the International Olympic Committee (IOC), a position from which he resigned in disenchantment in 1998, accusing the IOC of rampant corruption. He was also part of the group of former Olympic athletes that was pushing for the resignation of IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch. Only months after the scandal surrounding the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympic winter Games broke, Tewksbury became prominent around the world as a critic of the IOC and demanded reforms to the system. Tewksbury was also highly critical of Swimming Canada's organization in the wake of the national team's poor performance at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, where they failed to medal.

He suggested that there was a lack of accountability within Swim Canada, and that head coach Dave Johnson was given too much power. Tewksbury became a prominent advocate for gay rights and gay causes in Canada and the world. On May 16, 2003, Tewksbury joined the board of directors for the 2006 World Outgames in Montreal and was named co-president. He was a panelist at the 2003 National Gay and Lesbian Athletics Conference in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on a panel of LGBT Olympians that also included rower Harriet Metcalf and high jumper Brian Marshall. Tewksbury was the narrator for the TV show How It's Made during the first season. In 2006, he published his second book, an autobiography entitled Inside Out: Straight Talk from a Gay Jock. Tewksbury remains a public figure working as a motivational speaker, a television commentator for swimming events, and a continued activist. He is a board member of the Gay and Lesbian Athletics Foundation.

On November 30, 2006 Tewksbury was the Master of Ceremonies for the Tribute to former Prime Minister Paul Martin at the Liberal Party of Canada's Leadership and Biennial Convention in Montreal. During the 2008 Summer Olympics, Tewksbury served as CBC Sports' swimming analyst alongside play-by play announcer Steve Armitage. In December 2008 Tewksbury was invited by the government of France to speak at the United Nations in New York City on the day that a declaration was introduced that affirms gay rights and seeks to decriminalize homosexuality. On September 19, 2009, Tewksbury was inducted into Canada's LGBT Human Rights Hall of Fame, the Q Hall of Fame Canada, in honor of his outstanding achievements and efforts to end discrimination in the sports world. On August 5, 2010, he was named the chef de mission of the 2012 Canadian Summer Olympic team. In 2015, Tewksbury was presented the Bonham Center Award from The Mark S. Bonham Center for Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto, for his contributions to the advancement and education of issues around sexual identification. On July 23, 2015, Tewksbury presented his gold medal to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg for an exhibit promoting the power of sport to influence positive change. In 2017, Tewksbury was chosen as a Grand Marshal for the Fierté Canada Pride Montreal. In May 2019, Tewksbury performed an autobiographical one-man show called Belong, which was produced by Wordfest and staged at the DJD Dance Center in Calgary. The performance was a spin-off of his 2018 staged reading called 50 & Counting at Buddies in Bad Times theater in Toronto. Belong was then restaged in January 2020 as part of One Yellow Rabbit theater's 34th annual High Performance Rodeo in Calgary. In 2020, he became a Companion of the Order of Canada. In 2022 he is slated to appear as a panelist in Canada Reads, advocating for Esi Edugyan's novel Washington Black. Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill; et al. Team Canada - Official Olympic Team Website. Here Publishing. The Advocate. Here Publishing; September 26, 2000. ISSN 0001-8996. p. Moore, Dene (April 5, 2006). "Olympian Tewksbury reveals his struggles being gay". The Globe and Mail. Disrupting Queer Inclusion: Canadian Homonationalisms and the Politics of Belonging. Hobson, Louis B. (May 9, 2019). "Mark Tewksbury's still making waves with one-man show Belong".

This list describes characters from the anime and manga series Doraemon. Also listed are their original NTV voice actors (1973), followed by their TV Asahi voice actors (1979-2005; 2005-present). Part of the 22nd century characters are listed in The Doraemons. Each main character represents a primary school student archetype. Nobita appears in every episode of the anime, while Doraemon appears in most episodes, sometimes being substituted (for medical checkup or on leave) by his sister, Dorami. Note: In some translations of Doraemon, the names of these characters are different from the original names. 2.9 Nobisuke Nobi Jr. Albert in the Cinar dub of the series, is the title character and co-protagonist of the series. He is a cat-like robot from the future. He was yellow-skinned and had ears originally. However, his ears were accidentally eaten by a robot mouse. It left him heartbroken and caused his skin to turn blue. People often mistake him for a raccoon dog. He is sent back in time by Sewashi (Nobita's Great-great-grandson) to aid Nobita. Doraemon possesses a 4-dimensional pocket from which he can acquire various kinds of futuristic tools, gadgets, and playthings from a future department store.

He has also been shown to date with normal female cat.

He also has the tendency to panic during emergencies, characterized by him frantically trying to pull out a very much-needed tool from his pocket, only to produce a huge assortment of household items and unwanted gadgets. Still, Doraemon is very friendly and intelligent, not to mention long-suffering because of Nobita's antics. Since Sewashi sent Doraemon to the past, Doraemon has been living as the unofficial fourth member of Nobita's family and acts like a second son to Nobita's parents, since despite being a robot, he requires basic needs for a person, such as eating, and also sleeps in the closet of Nobita's bedroom. He also fears mice greatly (due to a robot mouse having eaten his ears), even go crazy about it and pull out devastating gadgets, and most of the times, Nobita saves Doraemon in such situations. Although he has no fingers in most media, he can hold things because of the suction cups in his hands. His favorite food is Dorayaki. He has also been shown to date with normal female cat. He is the elder brother of Dorami.

He is usually accompanied by Doraemon, who functions as his caretaker.

Nobita Nobi (野比, Nobi Nobita, English dub: Sidney in the Cinar dub, Specky in the Speedy dub, and Noby Nobi in the Bang Zoom! dub) is the co-protagonist of the series. He wears glasses, a red or yellow polo shirt with a white collar, and blue or black shorts and white socks and light blue shoes. Although he's not good at sports, he's good at shooting. He is usually accompanied by Doraemon, who functions as his caretaker. Although he's not good at sports, he's good at shooting and has been reflected in the movies many time. He's also good at string figure which sometime considered a girls' game. Son of Tamako and Nobisuke Nobi. Future father of Nobisuke (his son). Future husband or boyfriend of Shizuka and great-great-grandfather of Sewashi. Taurus), nicknamed Shizuka-chan (しずかちゃん) is a smart, kind and pretty girl. She is often represented by the color pink, and is seen wearing a pink shirt and skirt.

The word 'Shizuka (しずか)' means 'Quiet'. She is Nobita's best friend. She does not shun Nobita due to his failing grades, lazy disposition or constant failures. In fact, she often tries to encourage him to do better, though she usually fails to convince him. Shizuka likes to take a bath several times a day; however, a running gag in the series is that she is sometimes interrupted by a sudden appearance of Nobita (sometimes Doraemon, Gian, or Suneo) usually due to misuse of Doraemon's gadgets like the Anywhere Door (Doko Demo Doa in Japanese). Shizuka's skirt is also frequently seen getting flipped, either by Nobita misusing Doraemon's gadgets, or by the wind. Scenes in which her underwear is seen, or she is seen bathing, have been removed from the dubbed versions, especially in India, Europe, the United States and the United Kingdom. Her true passions are sweet potatoes, which she would rather keep to herself out of the knowledge of others, and the violin, in which her playing is just as horrendous as Gian's singing. She is also known for taking piano lessons unwillingly due to her mother's wishes (as she loves violin more), which is sometimes a reason for declining to hang out with friends (but she plays piano better than violin). Shizuka is an animal lover and keeps two pets at home: a dog, who is saved from succumbing to illness by Nobita and Doraemon in one story; and a canary which runs away on multiple occasions and causing Shizuka and Nobita to run around the city chasing her down.

She sometimes fansies some handsome idols on TV. Besides Nobita, Shizuka is also close to her classmate and popular student Dekisugi. Though they consider each other only as friends. Gemini), named Buster in the Cinar dub and Bob in the Speedy dub, usually known by the nickname "Gian" (「ジャイアン」, "Jaian", English: Big G) is a strong and quick-tempered local bully. He also frequently steals other children's stuff (especially Nobita's and Suneo's) under the pretext of "borrowing" them, unless the toy is damaged. He is known for his awful singing voice, though he considers himself a great singer. To prove this, Gian sometimes "invites" others to attend his concerts, under the threat of beatings. His singing is so horrible that, once, Nobita and Doraemon try to mute it in a silent world, his writings of the song lyrics in a board end up having the same effect as when they hear them.Though his voice is terrible in one of the episodes it was shown that a girl liked his singing. In some films, his singing is enhanced to become an effective weapon (as in 'Nobita's Great Adventure in the South Seas'). In some episodes when his voice is recorded and he hears it, he instantly denies it being his voice and threatens to beat up the person who his songs in a very bad way (which is an irony).


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