Is No 6 Finished

3D model raichuHave you already read our FAQ? We may already have the answer to your question down there, so please check it out first. How many chapters does the No. Why has the manga only been translated until chapter 21? Where can I get the No. 6 novels in English? Is it Shion or Zion? Does 'Nezumi' mean mouse or rat? Why was Nezumi translated to Rat in the official releases? Isn't Nezumi his name? Are Nezumi's mice real or robots? Are the insects bees or wasps? I've seen fanart here with Nezumi with short hair and Shion with purple eyes; what is up with that? How come there are different versions of the No. I have heard there are drama CDs for No. 6, where can I find them? I've just finished the anime and/or manga, and I want more! Do the novels continue after the events in the anime/manga and is there a sequel? Do Nezumi and Shion ever reunite? Who is Shion's father? How many chapters does the No. The No. 6 manga has been completed with 35 chapters in total, divided over 9 volumes. Why has the manga only been translated until chapter 21? The group that did the scanlations for No. 6 was asked by Kodansha to cease scanning, as the manga was picked up by Kodansha Comics for official translation.

Where can I get the No. 6 novels in English?

The scanlators complied, but with permission from Kodansha Comics they continued to provide summaries of later chapters. So if you want to read the full manga, you can pick up the official volumes in English! You can find links on our link page. Where can I get the No. 6 novels in English? Sadly, so far there has not been an official English translation of the No. 6 novels. There is however a fan translation to English for all of the novels plus the extra novel 'No. 6 Beyond', for which you can find a link on our links page. The novels have been translated to Chinese and French (incomplete in French so far), so you can buy them in those languages ​​if you can read those. As for English, there is no way as of now to legally buy them as a physical copy. If you want to support the official release and are able to afford it, you might want to consider getting the Japanese original releases! For links to buy, please refer to the page above. Is it Shion or Zion? Both are correct. The difference lies in the romanization systems used to write Japanese words in Latin script. Shion's name is written in Japanese as, the kanji characters for 'Aster'. The pronunciation of these characters is : shi-on. This is using the Hepburn romanization, which is easier for English/Latin language speakers. If you use to kunrei system, the romanization becomes sion, so no 'h'.

Why was Nezumi translated to Rat in the official releases?

The kunrei system is based on Japanese phonology and more consistent, but it doesn't reflect the pronunciaton for English/Latin language speakers as accurately. Both systems are used in Japan: kunrei is officially recognized, but Hepburn is used very often as well in official documents. Wikipedia has some introductions on both systems if you're interested. The Kodansha translation of the No. 6 manga uses Shion, as do we on this blog. Does 'Nezumi' mean mouse or rat? Both, actually! Japanese doesn't distinguish between the two like English does, and the word nezumi can mean both rat and mouse; sometimes it's even used more broadly to refer to other rodents. The Kodansha translation of the No. 6 manga has opted to translate Nezumi as Rat, which is just as accurate as Mouse. On a sidenote, Sasori's rats are referred to as dobunezumi, which is more specifically referring to the brown or sewer rat. Nezumi's mice are referred to as konezumi, with meaning little, making it more likely they are mice rather than rats. Why was Nezumi translated to Rat in the official releases? Isn't Nezumi his name? Well, technically, 'Nezumi' has always been a nickname. He never tells Shion his real name and no-one else seems to know it or ever mentions it, so for all intents and purposes, Nezumi is really just his name. However, it is made clear in the original text that others find it odd: Shion points out that he is going around calling himself a rat, which is what Nezumi translates to.

Kodansha Japan has asked the English localizers to maintain this sense of oddness, and thus, Nezumi was translated to Rat in the official releases. Are Nezumi's mice real or robots? Nezumi definitely has robotic mice with all kinds of capabilities, but some of his mice are real. These are the three mice that Shion has named Hamlet, Cravat and Tsukiyo. Tsukiyo is the smallest and black (with a name that means 'moonlit night'), while Cravat is yellowish-brown and has the same color as the pastry he was named after. Hamlet is the lightest of the three: he's white in the art works, but is described as light brown to gray in the novels. He got his name after the Shakespeare play, since he loves it when Shion reads him tragedies. This trio of mice fulfills all kinds of special missions for Nezumi, including delivering notes to Karan, who rewards them with cheese bread and muffins for their efforts. Are the insects bees or wasps? Wasps seem more likely as there are indeed parasitical wasps in the real world, but the Japanese word hachi can be used for both bee and wasp.

Most of the official designs seem to lean towards wasps, though sometimes the image of a bee is used. Both bee and wasp can be argued for. Short answer: we don't know. Shion seems to assume Inukashi is a boy upon their first meeting, but has his doubts later on; we never find out one way or another for sure. Japanese doesn't often use personal pronouns, and usually simply uses a person's name or not even an object at all. As you may have guessed, this is the case for Inukashi. Since Inukashi never makes a statement, we can only rely on other characters' perceptions, and it seems like they don't really know for sure either. I've seen fanart here with Nezumi with short hair and Shion with purple eyes; what is up with that? You are most likely looking at fanart using the novel descriptions for the characters.

When No. 6 was made into an anime and manga and toi8 came up with the concept art, some of the characters changed slightly in appearance. For instance, Nezumi is described as having short hair in the novels when they meet again four years later, and Shion's eyes are described as being dark purple, while his scar starts on his neck rather than his cheek. As the anime took a slightly different route than the novels, fan artists sometimes draw Nezumi and Shion with short hair and purple eyes respectively to show they are basing their art off the novels and not the anime, or simply prefer the novel descriptions. How come there are different versions of the No. Starting from volume 3, every volume of the manga has had two releases in Japan: the normal one, and the premium one. For volumes 3, 5, 7 and 8, this means the premium volumes came with a different cover and with an additional booklet, 'No. 6 PLUS', illustrated by Hinoki Kino. Volumes 4, 6 and 9 came with a special drama CD by the voice actors of the anime; volumes 4 and 6 also came with an extra short story by Atsuko Asano, the author of the novels, and volume 9 came with a special postcard. These three volumes all had the normal cover, but they came in a special box with its own cover. In addition, these premium editions came with black/white leaflets by Hinoki Kino, which differed per store in Japan depending on where you bought your volume. We put together a post a while ago with all these different covers, which you can find here.

Why Almost Everything You've Learned About Manga Is Wrong And What You Should Know

The premium editions are limited, so most are hard to come by new now, though of course you can always get lucky in a book store in Japan or online. Worried you're missing out on something? Fear not! The English translation of the manga has included all the special booklets by Hinoki Kino, and at least the first print of volume 8 came with color pages that were in the booklet in the Japanese premium edition. As for the special stories by Asano, they were kindly translated by 9th-avenue, so you can find those over here. I have heard there are drama CDs for No. 6, where can I find them? That's right, there are 9 drama CDs in total that we know of: 6 of them were included with the Japanese DVD release of No. 6 and follow the anime events, while 3 others were included with the manga and follow the manga/novel. Long story short: the special editions of volumes 4, 6 and 9 of the manga came with drama CDs. If you're lucky, you can still find these special editions online or second hand.

The No. 6 anime was split over 6 disc releases, with the Blu-ray and the special DVD releases of each containing a drama CD. The Japanese wikipedia lists the product codes for the Blu-ray, special DVD and normal DVD releases respectively, which should help you find them online. Some excerpts exist online: see our audio tag for some. You can also see our links page for where to buy No. I've just finished the anime and/or manga, and I want more! Do the novels continue after the events in the anime/manga and is there a sequel? Actually, the novels came first. The last of the novels was published in 2011, shortly before both the anime and manga started. So in that sense, the story is done, and the anime and manga were based on a story that was already published. However, in 2012, an extra novel came out: No. 6 Beyond. It has some background stories and shows what Shion and Nezumi are up to in between the final chapter and the epilogue of the final novel. So it's not a proper sequel, but it does add to the story. Since the last volume of the manga was published early 2014, it managed to incorporate some elements from the Beyond novel that the anime couldn't. To the best of our knowledge, novel author Atsuko Asano isn't planning on writing a sequel to No.


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